Living Traditionalism with Prof. Sherif Girgis

Join us on Tuesday, December 12th for the next installment of the James Wilson Institute and Center for Religion, Culture, and Democracy's ongoing webinar series. Prof. Sherif Girgis of Notre Dame Law School will deliver a webinar on Living Traditionalism, also the subject of his path-breaking law review article in the New York University Law Review.

Here's a short teaser from Prof. Girgis's upcoming webinar:

Today's Supreme Court is committed to originalism—the idea that the Constitution's meaning is fixed at ratification. But it often rests decisions on the post-ratification practices of other actors—Presidents, Congresses, or states. Call this method "living traditionalism": "traditionalist" because it looks to political traditions, and "living" because the traditions postdate ratification. Prof. Girgis will analyze this jurisprudential turn, on display in the Court's recent opinions in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health, Kennedy v. Bremerton, and New York State Rifle and Pistol Association v. Bruen. He will then propose a solution to this inconsistency.

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Sherif Girgis, the Associate Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame since 2021, is an accomplished author, lawyer, and philosopher. He graduated with his bachelor's in philosophy from Princeton, his master's in philosophy from Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, earned his J.D. at Yale Law, and is currently working towards a Ph.D. in philosophy from Princeton.

He has clerked for Justice Samuel Alito and Judge Thomas B. Griffith. His skills as an author are noticeable in both his academic articles and in his co-authored book, 
What Is Marriage? He has been published in the New York University Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, the Harvard Journal of Law, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times, among many other distinguished publications.  

 

More about the webinar:

JWI will be applying for CLE credit in Texas and Virginia.

Agenda

1 Hour CLE, including 15-20 minutes of Q&A 

Register Here